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A Sharing of the Effort to Know

"Teaching is not a technique exercised by the skilled on behalf of the unskilled." - E. Chomondley

Last Saturday I spoke to a group of homeschoolers in Roanoke, VA via Skype about the Charlotte Mason method and our homeschool.  Before I began, this group of educators - though strangers to me - sang "Happy Birthday to You".   Only the card my husband bought me topped that.  It plays "Rule, Britannia" when you open it.  Get it?  Like I'm the queen or something...

Marit and I dissecting a gladiola at The Hive.
Anyway, after talking about the benefits to children, the glorious books, the place of knowledge, and the like, I then talked about the benefits of this method for the moms.  This is the other side of the proverbial coin and it couldn't be more true.  I'm sure I would have burned out long ago if the method we used wasn't as living and engaging for me as it is for my students.  Indeed, I've seen more than one home educator happy to be done with what they see as the "chore" of home education.  Not me.  I'm just getting warmed up.

Cheney and I painting the saw-whet owl I literally stumbled upon at our TBG Community.

Ms. Chomondley took Mason's training in 1918.  She continues that quote at the top with these words -

"It is a sharing of the effort to know, using all that is best in the world of books, of music, of pictures, all that can be observed and cherished out of doors, all that hand and eye can make; all that religion, history, art, mathematics and science can reveal to the active mind."

Those who have graduated a few students  using these methods know that the "sharing of the effort to know" never ends.  At least not for those with active minds.

From joy to joy,
Nancy




9 comments:

  1. Happy birthday (again!) and thank you (again!) for sharing your wisdom with us on Saturday. We read, we study, but hearing a real mom sharing her experiences with multiple children does so much for seeing the lifestyle of learning "the Charlotte Mason way" (I am not sure I like how that sounds, however) makes all the difference!
    Thank you!

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    1. Sally,
      I am so glad you enjoyed my little talk. Skype is a challenge, as it is hard to connect with people you can barely see or hear. I'm thankful for the technology, regardless!

      Will I get to meet you at the CLUSA conference next June?
      From joy to joy,
      Nancy

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  2. Sometimes I think that is the worst bit of having only one child. Never mind. I just remember to enjoy every moment! There are always nieces and nephews!

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    1. Jeanne,
      Of course, you have certain freedoms that I don't have - travel, for one! You will be (already are?) the best auntie ever, friend.
      From joy to joy,
      Nancy

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  3. yay! it is my consolation, that the education of my children is not all there is. ;) heheh. though that part is WONDERFUL and fulfilling and sometimes consuming, it will come to an end! it is my own education that never ends and the sharing of which with whomever i'm with... there is great hopeful encouragement in that!

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    1. Amy,
      Thanks for your encouraging comment! Miss you!
      From joy to joy,
      Nancy

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  4. What excites me the most is how well these ideas work with children who have never been steeped in a Mason paradigm. The children in our church Wednesday afterschool program are thriving on books, music, art, history, and nature! I wish all children had this opportunity!

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  5. Habits for a lifetime. My prayer is writers, musicians, even accountants rise up to lead and for culture care! It needs reforming.

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  6. This is so me too..."I'm just getting warmed up."

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