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Friday, September 30, 2016

Citizenship Notebook




As I was preparing for the Weekend of Living Ideas, I revisited some notes about keeping a Citizenship notebook.   I know that others have used certain aspects of this here and there, and certainly I have made use of all of these notebooking activities - just not compiled into one notebook. Here, all the ideas are gathered and placed in one 3-ring binder with 5 sections. As you can see, you could begin building this notebook with younger students and slowly expand to incorporate appropriate activities. I don't share this to overwhelm you, but to inspire you! Seeing how all these elements could fit together will hopefully further your understanding of Citizenship.

      1. OURSELVES 
      2. PLUTARCH'S LIVES  
    • narrations
    • maps
       3. CURRENT EVENTS
    • narration entries
    • progress of a bill
        4. POETRY
        5. GREAT THOUGHTS
    • commonplace entries/quotes
    • striking words/definitions
    • narrations of other great lives
    • notes of historical events 
    • magnanimous folk
I bounced many ideas for this off of Bonnie and Jen a few years ago.  I thought I might share with you in order that you might develop your own Citizenship notebooks. I would love to know your thoughts on this and perhaps what you have used with success in your homeschool.

Autumn blessings,

Nancy

P.S. - more of my thoughts on Citizenship can be found here.


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10 comments:

  1. Wow. I love this idea! It is such a worthy addition to our "keeping" efforts. Thanks for the inspiration, Nancy!

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  2. Extremely timely and helpful! I'm in the beginning of Ourselves and just beginning current events with my oldest, so this gives me tons of ideas to build on, Nancy. :)

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    1. I'm glad you can use some of it, Amy dear! Savor and go slow with Ourselves...so many important things in that book.

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    2. Ok! Thank you for that advice!!! <3 Blessings.

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  3. I can see this kind of notebook being a very rich, rewarding activity for mind and soul as we grow ourselves and our children in habits, inspiration, and ultimately, character. My children are still too young for this kind of activity, but I'll be both filing this away for the future and considering this for my own learning and growing. Thank you! <3

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    1. Oh, and thank you also for linking this up to Keeping Company. I was so tickled to see your name pop up. :)

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  4. As someone who is just starting AO, and CM methods, I'm confused about all the different notebooks. I think they are wonderful ideas, and great for recalling information-but what would distinguish something from going into a Citizenship notebook vs a Book of Centuries, for example? Are there some beginner podcasts or blogs that touch on how to use notebooks in a CM homeschool? Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Also wondering at what age you started a Citizenship notebook? It sounds like something I'd like to keep for myself!

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    2. Hello, Rachel! I agree, there are so many notebooks mentioned that it can get confusing. The book "The Living Page" by Laurie Bestvater is the best resource for learning about all the notebooks used in a Mason education. I highly recommend it. The Book of Centuries is a main history tool that is a very unique form of vitality. I usually recommend what Laurie calls the 3 Pillars - a commonplace book, a nature notebook, and a book of centuries - to get started with. And by that I mean working on these 3 for a few years before expanding out to some of the others.

      I think of the Citizenship notebook as something for middle school and up and probably with a student who is not new to Mason. You should by all means be keeping at least a commonplace book and nature notebook if at all possible. Learn to live this rich life as you go - no need to wait!

      Thanks for the great questions and let me know if you have any others!

      Warmly,
      Nancy

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